Kenny Larsen

Actions speak louder than words?

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What matters more: what we do or what we say? Is it the case that “actions speak louder than words” or “do as I say, not as I do”?

Often, we oscillate between the two depending on what suits as best at the time. When we feel that someone’s words to us aren’t stacking up, we point to their lack of actions; when we know that our actions don’t match up to our words, we declare out that our words matter more. In reality we know that ideally the two would go together, that our actions and words would agree with one another. One of the things that we’ve seen in the early chapters of Acts is that the same is true of our evangelism. Our actions and our words in evangelism need to go together. It’s an error to think that our actions alone are enough for people to come to know Jesus, but without our actions our words either won’t be heard or will tend not to carry any weight.

Acts 3 is a good example of this, Peter does a remarkably good deed to a man who had crippled from birth. Through the name of Jesus, he heals him and has given him his life back. If there was ever a good deed that might turn people to Jesus without any words, then this might be it. But the people who witness it just stare in wonder and amazement. They’re astounded, but they don’t praise God and turn to Jesus in response. Yet, the good deed gives Peter and John hearing, so that their words might be heard. Then they speak of Jesus and the people’s need for him and in response many, many people are saved that afternoon.

Without the good deed Peter and John probably wouldn’t have got the hearing that they did, without their words the crowd wouldn’t have turned and believed in Jesus. Peter and John’s actions and words went together. Their actions gave the people watching a picture of what Jesus could offer and their words helped people to understand what they were seeing.

I wonder if our lives and evangelism bring our actions and words together in quite the same way? Do we elevate what we say above what we do, risking nobody actually hearing us? Or do we elevate what we do above what we say such that no one ever actually hears the good news of Jesus? What would it look like to bring the two back together so that our actions give us an opportunity to speak about Jesus?

Joining the dots between discipleship and evangelism

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As a church one of the things we’ve been thinking about recently is the relationship between discipleship and evangelism. Often, we think of discipleship and evangelism as separate entities. Discipleship is about our own growth as Christians, whereas evangelism is about reaching out with the gospel. Yet when we read the Bible, we see that this distinction isn’t as clear as we often think it is.

For example, see what Peter writes to a group of Christians in the New Testament:

“Beloved, I urge you as sojourners and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul. Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honorable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation.” (1 Peter 2:11–12, ESV)

What is Peter doing here?

He is urging his readers to live godly lives in the culture and society in which they live. He wants their lifestyles to be honourable when they’re amongst those who don’t know Jesus. This is about discipleship. This is Peter calling these Christians to increasingly live out their faith in the world. To grow in their godliness in every area of life, especially when they are around non-Christians.

But this discipleship has a purpose. This living out of the Christian life is seen by those who don’t yet know Jesus and Peter expects it to impact them. They will see the Christians good deeds, their different lifestyle, and come to glorify God.

The Christians Peter is writing to were literally sojourners and exiles, they were different to the people they lived amongst. There would have been the temptation to try and blend in, to fit in, to look like those around them. As Christians today, we can often face the same temptation, we don’t want to stand out at work or amongst our neighbours. Perhaps you fear what Peter says will happen to you, that people will “speak against you as evildoers.” It’s easier to try and just cross the line into Christianity yet to live our lives as closely matched to the world around us as we feel we can get away with. But not only is this damaging for our own relationship with God and our maturity as Christians, it’s devastating for our witness and evangelism.

We should be those who are growing in godliness and Christian maturity and therefore look increasingly like sojourners and exiles in the world we inhabit. The way we live our lives should look different to those around us, and we shouldn’t be surprised when that brings opposition and even claims that we are evil. But in the end, God uses the witness of our lives to give us opportunities for evangelism.

So where in your family life, your work, amongst your friends and neighbours does your life look the same as theirs? Should it look the same as theirs? In those places are you battling to live the most godly and honourable life you can in every aspect? If not, then what is stopping you?

One final thing, notice here that Peter is urging the other Christians on; perhaps we can be doing the same with one another, encouraging, urging, challenging one another to live righteous and honourable lives for the sake of those who don’t yet know Jesus.

This summer why not... care for one another?

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This is the first in our summer reads series entitled 'This summer why not...' Each book (or couple of books) in the series finish the sentence with it's/their theme. Visit our 10ofThose page to find and order them.

When Darkness Seems my Closest Friend (Mark Meynell)

For those of us who haven’t (yet) experienced depression it can seem impossible to understand and difficult to know how to walk with a friend who is struggling with it. Like many mental health issues it can seem so other, so disorientating, sometimes even a bit frightening. In his book, Mark describes in vivid terms what depression has been and felt like for him over many years. His descriptions give a very personal insight into what living, working and ministering looks like whilst suffering chronically. But perhaps the most helpful aspect of the book is how it joins the dots between depression, guilt, shame and the Gospel in a way that really is good news. Mark points to a saviour who is enough even in the most difficult and painful times which gives real hope and purpose.

Even though I haven’t struggled with depression I could readily see so many similarities between Mark’s experience and my own, the pain of genuine guilt, the curse of imagined guilt and the isolation of shame. We seem to differ primarily in the extent to which these things influence and afflict us, in that sense this book helped me realise how many ways we are all much more similar than we are different. It’s given me genuine points of contact to explore with those who are suffering from depression, places where I can come alongside and know that in a very profound way my need is much the same as theirs. 

We will all experience or know someone close to us who suffers from depression at some point in our lives. For those who haven’t experienced its effects first hand this book is a window into life with depression, yet also helps show how the light of the gospel can break into the deep darkness. Read it and it will give you compassion, hope and respect for those who are faithful in the midst of depression and, hopefully, make you better at caring for those with depression.

Side by Side (Ed Welch)

Side by side from Ed Welch is a great refresher of some of the things we looked at earlier in the year when we did the Growing Together course. If you want to think a bit more about what it looks like to walk alongside and disciple one another this might make a great summer read. Having read it on my own, I’d encourage you to find someone to read it with and put into practice some of Ed’s advice and wisdom.

The book is split into two halves, “We are needy” and “We are needed” and the first is probably the most significant. Often, we like to help others, to be needed, and that’s important. But at our most fundamental and basic level we are all those who are needy, who need God and who need others. Our pride and our obsession with expertise so frequently prevents us from reaching out to one another. Ed helps us to see our need clearly and gives really practical pointers on how we can be those who are able and willing to ask for help from God and from one another. If at the end of the summer we all were to be doing some of the things in the book more frequently our church life would be reflecting the gospel so much more.

You shall not commit adultery

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Generally, adultery is still considered wrong in our culture – most people wouldn’t actively encourage someone to go and commit adultery. There is a recognition that the breaking of the significant promises made during marriage is neither loving or good. Most people will know someone who has been deeply affected by adultery and we can all see the wider impact on the communities we’re part of. 

However, in the Bible, adultery isn’t a terrible wrong because of the pain it causes others but also because it’s an offence against God. In the Old Testament after King David has committed adultery he says, “Against you [God], you only, have I sinned and done what is evil in your sight,” (Psalm 51:4). I don’t think that David is saying he hasn’t wronged Bathsheba (with whom he committed adultery), nor Uriah (her husband) or anyone else involved. What he is acknowledging is that at its heart, adultery is despising God and His word (2 Samuel 12:9). There is a God-ward dimension to adultery which adds to the human pain and suffering it causes.

Secondly, adultery undermines the Gospel and misrepresents God. The unity that is found in marriage is supposed to be a very visual, lived out picture of the relationship between Christ and His church (Ephesians 5:25-33). The indissoluble union, the love, affection, faithfulness and submission that exists between Christ and the church should in some small way be reflected by marriage. A marriage marred by adultery paints a very different picture of the relationship between Jesus and the church. It paints a picture which calls into question everything that is good, comforting, joyful and secure between Jesus and the church.

The commandment to not commit adultery is, at root, a commandment to love other people and to love God, including representing God and the Gospel faithfully. Marriage lived in faithfulness to one another and to God is a wonderful testimony and picture of God’s faithfulness and love to his church. 

For those who know their guilt in this area all too well, Psalm 51 continues with David calling God his salvation, deliverer and the one who can clean him. Adultery is serious, but not unforgivable. In his Psalm, David is crying out to God knowing that God will wash clean those who turn to Him in repentance and faith. David knows that even for those who have committed adultery, God will not despise a broken and contrite heart (Psalm 51:17) and we know there is always forgiveness at the foot of Jesus’ cross.

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The Name

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What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet

So says Juliet in Romeo and Juliet. What’s in a name she asks? It doesn’t matter what you’re called, what your name is, it’s just a label that we use for convenience. 

It’s the same way we use names today, they’re a helpful way of referring to people. When I shout up the stairs for one of the children to come down (in principle!) the right child comes.  Their actual name doesn’t matter that much, we don’t pick baby names with the serious expectation that it will influence the character and identity of the child as they grow up.

But in the Bible, names are much more than simply tags so we know who we’re talking about. In the Bible, names tell you about the character of the person, it tells you what they’re like. Their name is intimately wrapped up in who they are as a person, in their identity. Treating someone’s name in a certain way was the equivalent of treating the person themselves that way. 

So how we treat and speak God’s name is how we are thinking of and treating God himself – the two can’t really be separated. Hence, the third commandment is so important even though in the midst of the other nine it’s often overlooked.

You shall not take the name of the LORD your God in vain, for the LORD will not hold him guiltless who take his name in vain.
— Exodus 20v7

As we’ve seen in previous weeks the context of this commandment is important. A few chapters earlier God has revealed his name to Moses, “I am who I am.”  He is the God of Israel’s Fathers, the God who has made and kept in covenants with them, the God who is powerful, the God who can save and rescue them. 

When we speak God’s name it’s the good and powerful God of underserved rescue who we are speaking of. And so, our use of His name should have the right sense of gravity and weight behind it. We should treat God’s name in the same way we treat God.

To take God’s name in vain has the sense of making it worthless or emptying it. It’s to use God’s name in a way that is false to who He really is. That might be by using God’s name inappropriately, swearing an oath on God’s name or wrongly claiming to speak words from God as we see elsewhere in the Bible.

But, and perhaps close to home, it’s also when we use God’s name in a way that empties it of its meaning – that makes God into someone much smaller than he is. 

When we pray we take God’s name and often in our speech we use God’s name. But are we doing it in an empty or meaningless way? Does the way we use God’s name reflect who he really is, or does it distort or empty him?

It’s worth a thought over the coming week.

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What other God would you want?

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We are made to worship, whether or not we’d always describe it like that. We worship other people, money, things, God, even hopes and dreams. We all have a god, or many gods, in our lives. It seems an unescapable part of our humanity – we were created to be those who worship. So, as we come to the first of the 10 commandments the question isn’t whether you will have a god but what kind of god you will have? 

And God spoke all these words, saying, “I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery. “You shall have no other gods before me. 
— Exodus 20v1-3

  Exodus 20 very briefly describes to us the God of the bible. He’s the God of rescue, power, love and grace. He is the God who rescued his people out of slavery to one of the most powerful empires of the day and He did it out of a love for his people even though they had done nothing to deserve it. 

The rescue of God’s people from slavery in Egypt gives us a very visual picture of our rescue from slavery to sin. A rescue that flowed out of God’s great love for his world and was of pure grace, it cost him his only son and we’d done nothing to deserve it.

It shows us what kind of God it is who calls us to worship him alone and have no other gods alongside him. There will be many other gods that call us to follow after them, things we desire, that drive us, that captivate us. But none of them offer us the freedom, life and deep-seated joy that the God of the bible can give. Often other gods seem to offer so much, security, happiness, longevity, the easy life, but in the end they all fail. The God of the bible has shown that he’s a good God who has the power to deliver on His promises. 

It is a command that we should have no other gods, but it’s a command that’s for our good because it leads to freedom and life. What other god can offer that? What other god would you want?

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Is it just 'trust God and it'll be okay?'

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It was a question raised during our first evening of our Growing Together course. Is this what discipleship boils down to? Whatever suffering we’re facing, trials we’re going through, sins we’re wrestling with, we simply need to trust God and it’ll be okay?

There’s a wonderful element of truth implicit within the questions. It recognises God’s power, as well as His inherent love, compassion and goodness that means He can, and will, work in every circumstance. It also recognises our limitations, there is both tragedy and evil in the world and our ability to change that is often limited. There are things that happen to us that we have no control over and consequences to our actions that we could never foresee.

However, the best discipleship is more than simply stating the truth of who God is.

Firstly, the best discipleship speaks truth out of an abundance of love and compassion for somebody. I’m reminded of the raising of Lazarus in John 11. Jesus tells Martha the truth, that her brother will rise again (“It’ll be okay” – vs. 23) and that she must believe in Him (“Trust God” – vs. 27). But the whole episode is wrapped in Jesus’ love and compassion for her and the wider family and friends. He is deeply moved and troubled when He sees the distress of those who have lost a loved one (vs. 33,38) and He weeps with them (vs. 35). Jesus’ words of truth to Martha are said to someone He knew and loved. They’re not abstract, cold, and heartless platitudes.

Secondly, Jesus tells Martha the truth of who He is as the redeemer and how that was relevant to her struggle. In our discipleship we need both parts of the equation. We need to speak the truth and apply it to the particular sin or suffering someone is facing. Why does what Jesus has done and who he is, matter? How does it bring hope and comfort in this moment? Lazarus had died, so Jesus spoke of the hope of the resurrection He brought (vs. 25-26). He showed Martha why trusting in Him would ultimately mean it was okay. He spoke truths that were relevant and gave her genuine hope and comfort in the midst of her pain.

In our discipleship, we must be reminding one another of who God is. Yet we need to be doing it in a way that is relevant to the struggles someone is facing and out of a Christlike love and compassion for them.

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Growing Together

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And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge and all discernment, so that you may approve what is excellent, and so be pure and blameless for the day of Christ, filled with the fruit of righteousness that comes through Jesus Christ, to the glory and praise of God.
— Philippians 1:9-11

Sometimes when we talk about discipleship, maturity, or counselling it’s not clear where we’re heading. What are we seeking to mature into? What’s the target? Where are we heading and what are we hoping to achieve?

There are dozens of voices telling us who we should be seeking to become and what kind of person we ought to be. Some of those voices are external, the voices of our culture that lure us with the promises of acceptance and success if we follow them and threaten us with ridicule and isolation if we demur. Or the voices of parents, friends and family, who have their own particular vision of what and who we should be. Other voices are internal, the voices in our own minds that tell us what we deserve, can achieve, or have failed to become. Like a plant growing towards the sun all these voices give us a direction to grow in and a target to aim towards. 

In the passage above the Bible speaks another voice, it gives us a different direction to seek to grow in, a God-ward direction. Paul is writing to a church with his prayer and hope for who they will become and who they will mature into. It’s a maturity that’s rooted in love, lived out in wisdom, achieved through Jesus, and that brings God glory and praise. It’s a direction that we need to regularly turn back to. Our discipleship is a means of doing that, it’s a means of re-orientating ourselves towards a life that brings God glory and praise. 

For the next three weeks at Christ Church Walkley we’ll be looking together at how we help one another to grow into the kind of people Paul describes. We’ll make Paul’s prayer for the Philippian church our prayer. Each week I’ll try and share some of my reflections on what we’ve been discussing and learning here on this blog.

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Small Groups - Reaching out

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This is the fourth post in a mini-series looking at the purpose of our Small Groups here at Christ Church Walkley. See the first post here, second here and third here.

I’ve often found that evangelism gets tagged on to small group life rather than being a focus of what we’re doing together. When time is short, and life is hard, evangelism tends to drop off most small groups radars. I wonder whether this sometimes reflects our lives individually, where our focus is more easily directed to growing as a Christian and being in the safety of church family. When we read 1 Peter though we get a different perspective on evangelism in our life together:

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvellous light. Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy. Beloved, I urge you as sojourners and exiles to abstain from the passions of the flesh, which wage war against your soul. Keep your conduct among the Gentiles honourable, so that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day of visitation.
— 1 Peter 2:9–12, ESV

In this passage we’re described in two ways, the first is obviously positive, that we are now God’s chosen people. But see the reason Peter gives for why God has made us into his people, that we would proclaim God’s goodness. We are made to be God’s people for the purpose of proclaiming God’s excellencies – glorifying him. This view moves evangelism from an additional component of our lives to the very centre. Notice that it’s also something we say, we proclaim it, our evangelism has to involve an element of speaking about God to others.  As small groups proclaiming the gospel is fundamental to who we now are. Whether that happens together or by supporting one another in prayer as we do it individually, proclaiming the gospel is part of who we’ve been made to be.

The second way we’re described is as sojourners and exiles. We’re sojourners and exiles in this world because we’re now a new people with a new home – we belong somewhere else. But that brings its own challenges, we live as Christians in a world with different values and morals and we’re constantly being called to conform. Obedience to God, living as his people, can be immensely challenging in this world, but Peter sees it as a means by which people will come to glorify God when Christ returns. Our evangelism involves the way we live in our workplaces, families and community. Proclamation of the gospel and living a godly life amongst unbelievers are inseparable and fundamental to what it is to be one of God’s people. If our small groups are going to places where we reach out from we’ve got to be supporting and encouraging one another to be living as exiles and reminding each other that we are a people who have received mercy so that we can tell others about our God.

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Small Groups - Growing together

This is the third post in a mini-series looking at the purpose of our Small Groups here at Christ Church Walkley. See the first post here, and second here.

Last week’s post saw how one way of avoiding Small Groups becoming inward-focussed and self-seeking was for them to be continually looking outward to God, seeking to bring him glory. In practice, part of that involves growing together in Christian maturity, so our lives and speech are increasingly glorifying to God. Take a look at Ephesians 4:25-32:

Therefore, having put away falsehood, let each one of you speak the truth with his neighbour, for we are members one of another. Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger, and give no opportunity to the devil. Let the thief no longer steal, but rather let him labour, doing honest work with his own hands, so that he may have something to share with anyone in need. Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear. And do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption. Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamour and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.
— Ephesians 4:25-32, ESV

This follows on from Paul telling those he was writing to that by knowing Jesus they have been fundamentally changed, and they should be growing in their Christlikeness. And here Paul gets very specific about what that growth looks like. I want to highlight just two aspects of what hes says in the passage quoted above.

Firstly, notice the emphasis on what we say. We are to speak the truth, to build one another up with our words, to avoid slander and falsehood. The reference to not grieving the Holy Spirit probably fits here too, most likely referring to Israel’s grumbling in the wilderness (See Exodus 15 and Isaiah 63).  Our words matter more than we might think. It’s not just that dishonesty, corrupting and untimely words are wrong and sinful, but they damage our Christian brothers and sisters and grieve the Holy Spirit. The call is to have both the right content to our speech and the right manner of saying it. Rebuking someone harshly may be honest, but is unlikely to give grace to them or to build them up. Simply being ‘nice’ and being unwilling to address areas of sin with one another rapidly becomes dishonest. Neither help us to grow together in Christlikeness.

Secondly, notice that it all stems from God’s forgiveness of us. We treat one another in the same way that God has treated us. If we are to speak openly and honestly with one another we will inevitably touch nerves and sensitive areas. We will all make mistakes. We will likely waver between speaking falsely and speaking insensitively. So we must be willing to forgive one another when we get it wrong, to not respond with bitterness, anger and slander, but with honesty, kindness and humility. If we are to grow together in Christlikeness then our attitude towards each other must, at root, reflect God’s attitude to us. He has treated us on the basis of forgiveness and mercy, so we must treat one another in the same way – even when that means absorbing the cost and pain of someone else’s sin towards us.

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Small Groups - Curved in or curved out?

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This is the second in a mini-series of posts looking at the purpose of our small groups at Christ Church Walkley. See the first post here.

Sometimes the fear with small groups is that they become curved in on themselves, self-centred, self-seeking and exclusive. The concern is legitimate, any small group of people meeting regularly in any context can become this way. But it doesn’t have to be what happens with small groups, and if they’re fulfilling their bigger purpose of helping us grow in Christian maturity, they won’t.

Often the answer to groups becoming curved in on themselves is to encourage them to look outside of themselves, and focus on those they’re trying to reach. There’s good wisdom in this, and the final post in the series will look at that. However, I want to suggest a more fundamental place we need to look outside of ourselves, to God, and his glory. 

Our growth in maturity isn’t primarily to serve ourselves, but to bring God glory. Ephesians 3:14-21 talks this way, some excerpts are below:

For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, from whom every family in heaven and an earth is named, that according to the riches of his glory he may grant you to be strengthened with power through his Spirit in your inner being … that you may be filled with all the fullness of God. Now to him who is able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think, according to the power at work within us, to him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, forever and ever. Amen
— Ephesians 3:14-21, ESV

How do we grow in maturity, how are we strengthened? Out of the riches of God’s glory, by God working in us. Our growth in maturity is rooted in God’s work, not ours, therefore he deserves the recognition and praise for it. And that’s where Paul goes at the end, his prayer is ultimately that through our growth God would be glorified. 

I wonder if that’s our desire as we sit together reading the bible, as we pray, as we counsel one another? Is it our hope that God’s glory would be seen through us and in us? That our transformation would be a testament to the Spirit's work in our lives?

Small groups are places where the Spirit should be at work through God’s word and through his people. They should be places where we see God’s glory. 

One way small groups avoid becoming curved in on themselves is when they are looking outward to God; when they are seeking and praying for God to be glorified through them. It’s worth asking ourselves why we want to grow in knowledge, why we want to overcome our temptations, why we want to work through our sin and suffering? Is it for our glory, so we look better, fit in more, are more esteemed, more glorified, or is it so that God is glorified? If it’s for us, then we’ll likely tend towards being curved in on ourselves. If it’s for God’s glory then we’ll tend to increasingly be looking away from ourselves – to God, and in the end to others too. 

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Small Groups - the BIG picture

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New Year, New Small Groups

Since we started Christ Church Walkley, Small Groups have been a significant part of our life together. They’ve been vehicles for serving on a Sunday, evangelism, pastoral care and discipleship amongst other things. There’s something to be said for keeping groups running for an extended period; the trust, openness and depth of prayer that comes from reading the Bible and praying together can’t easily be shortcut. That said, after five years we felt it was time to refresh and relaunch the groups, to give them a new lease of life. Inevitably that begs the question of what are our small groups meeting for, what’s the purpose of them, what are they trying to achieve? Small groups have become the ‘done thing’ in many churches, but often there is a lack of clarity of what their purpose is. Are they bible study groups? Prayer groups? Friendship/support groups? Small churches? A bit of everything?

Over a small series of four posts I want to explore some of the key things that I think should make up the purpose of our Small Groups, and might be helpful to others elsewhere.

The Big Picture

Rather, speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body, joined and held together by every joint with which it is equipped, when each part is working properly, makes the body grow so that it builds itself up in love.
— Ephesians 4:15-16, ESV

Whilst not about small groups directly, there isn’t really a biblical conception of small groups in the way we have them, I think these verses help us see the bigger picture of what we’re trying to do. We’re trying to 'grow up’ and make ‘the body grow.’ In one sense it’s that straightforward, small groups are there to make us grow up together into Christ, to be more like him. Here I just want to point out three things from this passage that show us a little bit about how that happens. 

Firstly, it’s something we do together, the passage talks about us all growing up together as one body. Christian maturity and Christian growth happens together. It requires the interactions with one another, to work together, to serve one another, to build one another up. It’s not a solo enterprise. Trying to grow up into Christ on our own, by choice, is a sign of Christian immaturity.

Secondly, notice that a significant mechanism for growth is speaking, and a particular kind of speech. We are to speak ‘the truth’ to one another - the gospel truth. Growth doesn’t come from simply speaking honestly to one another, although we should be. But by speaking the gospel into one another’s lives day by day, week by week. Small groups should be refuge from the pressures of the world, to conform to other ways of thinking, to have a different Lord. Small Groups are where we remind one another of the truth of the gospel and our Lord Jesus.

Thirdly, we do all of this in the context of love. Notice how the passage starts telling us to 'speak the truth in love’ and finishes describing the body of Christ building itself up in love. Love for Jesus and for one another is the basis for our growth and the criterion for assessing our growth. small groups should be a context where our love for Jesus and one another can be shown in our speech and actions. And, if our small groups are working properly, we should be seeing an increase in our love for Jesus and one another over time.

Small groups are more than bible study groups, more than prayer groups, more than support groups. They should probably include elements of those, but they are all means by which we can speak the truth to one another in love so that we grow up!

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